The art or printmaking

High quality prints in limited editions are masterly examples of the virtuosity of printmaking and demonstrate why prints (or “editions”) have remained so popular a medium for art collectors. Moreover, .limited edition prints will very often provide the astute investor the opportunity to acquire recognized and 'prize-winning' names in art, adding a certain gravitas to one’s developing collection.

What is a fine art limited edition art work?

A Limited Edition Print is derived from an image produced from a block, a plate, a stone, on zinc, copper or some similar surface on which the artist has worked closely with a print maker or master printer. Unlike paintings or drawings, prints exist in multiples.  The total number of impressions an artist decides to make for any one image is called an edition.

Each impression in an edition is numbered and personally signed by the artist. An image may be based on an original painting, 'after an oil', or the artist may paint "maquettes" specifically for prints. The artist may also create an image directly onto the plates, depending upon the chosen medium.

The Processes

Each of the various methods of printmaking yields a distinct appearance.  Artists choose a specific technique in order to achieve a desired result. The choice made by the artist to produce an image "in print" is the same as choosing to work in oil or any other medium.  The only difference in print lies in the possibility of producing a number of near identical images.  Etchings, silkscreens, woodcuts and collagraphs are some of the principle printmaking techniques.

With expert print-makers producing a range of Limited Editions to international standards, these artworks remain highly collectible not to mention, very affordable!

©Catherine Asquith October 2017

Catherine Asquith has been working within the Australian art market, and more recently, the Asian art market, across both the primary and secondary sectors for the past twenty years and is a member of the Art Consulting Association of Australia (ACAA).

Jason BENJAMMIN, "The Crows", 2005, edition of 60, multi-plate etching, Image size: 54 x 80cm,Paper size: 78 x 108cm, printed on Hahnemuhle 100% rag 300gsm

Jason BENJAMMIN, "The Crows", 2005, edition of 60, multi-plate etching, Image size: 54 x 80cm,Paper size: 78 x 108cm, printed on Hahnemuhle 100% rag 300gsm